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MEDIA INFORMATION

http://faso.com/fineartviews/105117/good-galleries-vs-great-galleries
Good Galleries vs Great Galleries
by Mark Edward Adams on 28/03/2016

http://faso.com/fineartviews/104323/the-definition-of-art-by-me
The Definition of Art, by Me
by Carolyn Henderson on 07/03/2016

 

http://www.artmarketmonitor.com/2015/07/30/if-contemporary-art-is-so-great-why-doesnt-anyone-make-any-money/
If Contemporary Art Is So Great, Why Doesn’t Anyone Make Any Money?
by
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-30/why-do-so-many-art-galleries-lose-money-

Why Do So Many Art Galleries Lose Money?
The art business is booming, but many galleries are barely getting by. One German expert thinks he knows the answers
by
James Tarmy, July 30, 2015
http://en.artmediaagency.com/112875/do-art-galleries-need-to-review-their-business-model/
Do art galleries need to review their business model?
Berlin  |  6 August 2015  |  AMA
Galleries, June 2014
WORKPLACE ART
Art in the Office
... By contrast, since 2009 Mikhail Zaitsev of Hay Hill Gallery has successfully shown very large sculptures which cannot fit into his gallery in big prestigious London business centres; he has 3 sculptures 4 metres high on display at present in the heart of Mayfair at Berkeley Square House. He says he has sold many such huge sculptures over the years, one being recently shipped to Latvia ...
HANGING OFFENCE : HAY HILL GALLERY
BY TREBUCHET ON DEC 26, 2013
Maintaining a distinct profile as a gallery, whilst undergoing a change in premises, comes with its challenges.
London, in common with any centuries-old city, changes its nature from borough to borough, street to street. Hay Hill Gallery’s Sarah Jones takes a brisk attitude to change, seeing it as an essential part of the gallerist’s craft. Hanging Offence sets the questions.
Bruce Hamilton Clark 'Tea Was A Yellow Fish. Memoirs and Paintings'.
First published in 2013 by Analecta Publishing.

Born in 1937, just before the Second World War, Bruce Clark lived in London during the early years of intensive bombing, and was later evacuated to Scotland. His family was homeless when the war ended and eventually settled in Surrey, where he attended a local grammar school. He worked in a London office before joining the RAF in the mid-1950s, serving in Berlin in the days before the notorious wall was built. In 1958 he became a student at a unique art school, Bath Academy of Art, at Corsham, and proceeded to a teaching career which spanned the full age range from infants to post-graduates. The first twelve years were spent in two secondary modern schools in different parts of the country. He was employed as a school inspector in the formative years of OFSTED, and also produced and exhibited paintings during a period of over fifty years.

Cover illustrations. Front: Deserted Shore 2, 2009; back: Cool Shower Approaching, 1992
The Art Investor, 2012, Issue 1
Off the Wall
Kevin Payne talks to Ross Tiffin at the Hay Hill Gallery, Cork Street, London
BY ROSS TIFFIN
Waiting in a quiet corner of the Hay Hill Gallery, while Kevin Payne finished dealing with a client, I found myself musing on the eclectic nature of art and the wide and varied pleasure it brings to so many people.

London Evening Standard, Tuesday 16 August 2011
The Mayfair gallery, the tycoon and their £2m battle over 'missing' Warhol
Rashid Razaq
Published: 16 August 2011
An Andy Warhol painting is at the centre of a £2 million High Court battle between a Mayfair art gallery and a Norwegian businessman.

The Great Britain - Russia Society
Russian Art  In London. The Commercial Dimension
Article by Ann Kodicek,
August 2005
Twenty years ago, Bond Street bustled with newly liberated Russian artists, presenting their portfolios to the Western art world. For a time, every gallery had its Russian artist. Russian art, of every kind, was “in”, and selling by the arshin. Then people learned that the Union of Artists (to which virtually all these artists belonged) was not the Soviet equivalent of the Royal Academy and that these artists, even at home, were largely unknown. Prices plummeted, collectors began to hate their purchases, salerooms were lumbered with shiftless works and Russian artists worth their salt moved on to Germany or USA. ...

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